Monday, September 24, 2007

CP 29

As you may know, CP 29 is currently stuffed and mounted outside the Canadian Pacific headquarters in downtown Calgary, Alberta.

CP 29 was famous for being one of the last three CP steam locomotives in regular freight service, the other two being 136 and 144. They worked between Chipman and Norton on the CP line, and they continued working because of the very light bridges on the line. They were eventually replaced in 1959, I think.

CP 29 eventually came to the Salem and Hillsborough Railroad where it was returned to service and used on the passenger runs. It always ran in company with another engine (except for one time). Tragically it was damaged in the 1994 fire, and after a few years it was returned to CP, who cosmetically restored it and put it on display.

Brian Barchard sent me these two photos of CP 29 in Calgary.




More details on CP 29 are available at the New Brunswick Railway Museum website.

2 comments:

Kris Seaboyer said...

"CP 29 was famous for being one of the last three CP steam locomotives in regular freight service, the other two being 136 and 144. They worked between Chipman and Norton on the CP line, and they continued working because of the very light bridges on the line. They were eventually replaced in 1959, I think."

Actually, these 3 locos were the last 4-4-0's left in regular uninterrupted freight service with a major railway in North America.

They were replaced in 1959 with the CLC 44 ton diesel-hydraulic siderod switchers.

By the way, it was great meeting you, Steve.

Brian B. said...

Some further comments on # 29 and the two other " venerable fugitives " from the nineteenth century ( as once referenced in historical rail publications ).

The 44 tonner that Kris mentioned, was HS-5C class diesel-hydraulic, # 18, whose weight was acceptable for the portion of the Minto Sub, between Norton and Chipman. It arrived in the early fall of 1959.

# 144 was taken out of service in November 1959, followed by # 136 the spring of 1960. # 29 served as back up to the 44 ton diesel, until itself was withdrawn in October 1960.

The 29 had the distinction of pulling the last steam hauled passenger train on the CPR, November 06th, 1960, in Montreal.